Communication Ph.D.’s on the Job Market

JoshJoshua P. Bolton is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Communication at the University of Missouri (M.S., Corporate Communication, University of Wisconsin - Whitewater, 2012; B.A. Political Science, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 2006). His research examines political campaign communication within electoral and issue based contexts utilizing rhetorical and content analytic methodologies. Joshua’s dissertation project examines how the modern (1972 -present) nominating conventions of the two major parties utilize narratives to create and promote a brand for both the party and candidateJoshua is also a member of and frequent presenter at NCA and CSCA, particularly in the Political Communication and Public Relations Divisions. He currently serves as a research assistant to the Political Communication Institute within the Department of CommunicationJoshua has experience working with large lectures and smaller classes, including Public Speaking, Public Speaking for Business, Public Speaking for Education, Introduction to Human Communication, and Persuasion. Joshua also currently serves as the Director of Communication for the University of Missouri Graduate Professional Council. He received the Frank and Lila Gilman Memorial Fellowship Award in May 2016.

Josh P. Bolton
jpbdm6@mail.missouri.edu
Advisor: Dr. Mitchell McKinney
Vita


NettieNettie A. Brock is a doctoral candidate in the department of Communication at the (B.A., Broadcasting and Electronic Media: Film Techniques and Technologies, Eastern Kentucky University, 2008; M.A., Cinema Studies, San Francisco State University, 2012). Her research examines the relationships between popular culture and narrative forms, as well as how those narrative forms shape and influence representation. Nettie’s dissertation project theorizes a new approach to genre. Rather than conceiving of genres as discrete, independent categorizations, Nettie suggests that genre is actually an intricate rhizome of traits and cultural influences. By theorizing genre in this way, Nettie sees that all generic programs can be conceptualized on a similar level, and some texts are not privileged above others. Nettie has published chapters in A Sense of Community and Seeing Fans. Nettie has experience teaching a variety of classes in a variety of university settings. She has worked in large lectures, small break-out style discussion sections, and stand-alone seminars. She has worked as a teaching assistant and instructor for classes such as Public Speaking, Media and Society, Film History, and Television Criticism and Analysis.

Nettie A. Brock
Nabz86@mail.missouri.edu
Advisor: Dr. Benjamin Warner
Vita


GraceGrace Y. Choi is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Communication at the University of Missouri (B.A., Communication, University of Illinois at Chicago, 2010; M.A., Media and Cinema Studies, DePaul University, 2012). Her research bridges between digital production and media effects scholarship to identify alternative educational opportunities that can enhance people’s digital literacy skills. Grace’s dissertation project examines youth’s digital production activities on social media to construct a new theoretical model that can explain the connection between participatory culture, creativity, and motivation. Her goal is to empower people, especially minority youth, to partake in digital innovations through digital literacy education that can diversify the technology field. Grace is also a digital producer who has experience in creating videos, audio, graphics, and marketing strategies. Her creative work can be found on her website and her scholarly work can be found in journals such as Psychology of Popular Media Culture, Popular Music & Society, and Cyberpsychology, Behavior & Social Networking. At the University of Missouri, Grace has taught courses in Message Design and Writing for the Media, Media Communication in Society (in-person and online), and Public Speaking. Grace currently serves as the assistant to the Chair, Director of Graduates Studies, and Directors of Media & Diversity Center in the Department of Communication and is also a data analyst for Kansas City Women in Technology. She plans to defend her dissertation in January 2017 and is seeking a tenure track position to begin in the fall of 2017.

Grace Y. Choi
grace.choi@mail.missouri.edu
Advisor: Dr. Lissa Behm-Morawitz
Vita


Cristin A. Compton (B.A., Speech Communication, Music, Drury University, 2008; M.A., Communication Studies, Missouri State University; 2012; PhD, Communication, University of Missouri, 2016) is a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Missouri with appointments in the Department of Communication and the Division of Inclusion, Diversity, and Equity. Her scholarship focuses on power, identity work, and organizing processes, specifically exploring how sexuality, gender, and power intersect to organize people and their lived experiences. Cristin’s dissertation project proposed a theoretical construct she calls “co-sexuality,” the process of communicatively constructing “normal” sexuality and adhering and diverging from that norm. She has been invited to present her scholarship and earned top paper awards at conferences including the National Communication Association, The Organization for Communication, Language, and Gender, and the Central States Communication Association. She was also selected to present her research at the 2015 National Communication Association’s Doctoral Honors Seminar. Her research has been published in Management Communication Quarterly and The Political Language of Food. Cristin is also a passionate teacher who has been given the opportunity to develop and teach a variety of lecture and online courses to students from multiple majors and points in their academic careers. Courses she has developed and taught include: Gender, Language, and Communication; Organizational Communication; Public Speaking; Business Public Speaking; Honors Public Speaking; and Themes in Gender & Work. Cristin has also served as the Assistant Basic Course Director and the Interim Basic Course Director for COMM1200: Public Speaking.

Cristin A. Compton
CristinCompton@mizzou.edu
Advisor: Dr. Debbie Dougherty
Vita


Molly M. Greenwood is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Communication (B.A., Communication, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, 2007; M.A., Communication Studies, Marquette University, 2009). The primary goal of her research is to produce knowledge concerning political polarization in today’s mass-mediated environment. One of her primary aims is to improve our theoretical understanding of how mediated political communication messages affect individuals’ political learning and political engagement, particularly within social media contexts. Her dissertation explores how political posts on social media create social pressure to conform, thereby influencing political polarization, political engagement, and political interest. Her co-authored research has been published in journals such as Computers in Human Behavior, Argumentation and Advocacy,and American Behavioral Scientist. She has also published research in books such asAlieNATION: The Divide & Conquer Election of 2012 and Communication in the 2008 U.S. Election: Digital Natives Elect a President. Further, Molly has presented single – and co-authored work at the annual meetings of the International Communication Association, the National Communication Association, and the Central States Communication Association. At the University of Missouri, she has taught Political Communication and Public Speaking (both regular and Honors sections). Additionally, she has served as a teaching assistant for a writing intensive course, Survey of Communication Studies. Molly has also served as a graduate student co-advisor for Lambda Pi Eta, the National Communication Association’s undergraduate honor society.  

Molly M. Greenwood
mmgth9@mail.missouri.edu
Advisor: Dr. Ben Warner
Vita


LexieAlexie Hays is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Communication at the University of Missouri (B.A., Organizational Communication, University of Missouri, 2011; M.A., Interpersonal Communication, Illinois State University, 2013). Her research blends interpersonal/family and health communication to examine how individuals and families communicatively manage and maintain individual and relationship well-being in the face of difficulty. Alexie’s dissertation project applies the Communication-Based Model of Coping in the Family System to explore the degree to which parents with a child with autism spectrum disorder perceive that their extended family members are meeting their standards for supportive communication. Using a one-with-many design, the project aims to advance research on (1) family systems, (2) standards, (3) communication-based coping, and the (4) impact of a cognitive disability on the communication and (5) well-being of family members. Alexie’s work has been featured in journals such as Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Health Communication, Journal of Family Communication, and Communication Monographs. At Illinois State University and the University of Missouri, Alexie has taught courses in Interpersonal Communication, Family Communication, and Public Speaking (traditional setting and via iTV as an adjunct at Central Methodist University), and has been a TA for Survey of Communication Studies, Interpersonal Communication, and Human Communication and Aging. Alexie was the recipient of the Outstanding Graduate Research Award (2016) and Loren Reid Outstanding Graduate Teaching Award (2015) in the Department of Communication. She currently serves as the assistant to the chair of the Department of Communication. She plans to defend her dissertation in January 2017, and is actively seeking a tenure track position to begin in the fall of 2017.

Alexie Hays
alexie.hays@mail.missouri.edu
Advisor: Dr. Colleen Colaner
Vita


JoeJoseph M. Hoffswell is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Communication at the University of Missouri (B.A., Communication, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2009; M.A., Communication and Media Studies, Northern Illinois University, 2011). His research combines media effects with social identity in order to examine how specific social identities can influence media consumption and interaction. Joe’s dissertation project examines people who self-identify as gamers and how the identity of a gamer impacts effects that are found after playing a violent video game. For the dissertation project, Joe has created a new theory specific to gamers that will help researchers disseminate how different types of gamers react to violent video game stimulus.  Joe wants to expand his research to examine more identities related to heavy media consumption and to look at how gamers evolve and interact in different cultures across the world.  Joe also wants to use the theory created for his dissertation and examine how other types of video games will impact different types of gamers. Joe has an article published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior & Social Networking, and one under review at Communication, Culture, and Critique.  Joe also has several manuscripts that will be sent to academic journals over the next few months. Joe has taught Public Speaking and Media Communication in Society (in-person and online) at the University of Missouri.  Joe has over 7 years teaching experience for Communication courses and has taught in 5 different Communication departments at 5 different colleges and universities including University of Missouri. Joe plans on defending his dissertation in April 2017 and is seeking a tenure track position to begin the fall of 2017. 

Joseph M. Hoffswell
jmhoffswell@mail.missouri.edu
Advisor: Dr. Lissa Behm-Morawitz
Vita


Jennifer Lewallen is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Communication, with a research appointment in the Reynolds Journalism Institute, at the University of Missouri (B.A., Communication, University of California Santa Barbara, 2008; M.A., Mediated and Mass Communication, Pepperdine University, 2012). Her research interests include representations of women, youth and non-dominant cultural groups in popular media and the influence of media on perceptions of the self and other. She has conducted content analytic and experimental works on communication in both traditional and new media contexts. For example, her dissertation explored how priming body consciousness in a laboratory setting impacts experiences in either fitness-focused or appearance-focused virtual reality conditions. Jennifer has presented several single and co-authored papers at the National Communication Association and Central States Communication Association conferences. Her work has been published in Mass Communication and Society; Communication Studies; Social Media + Society; Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking; Journal of Social Media in Society; and Psychology of Popular Media Culture. She currently has three manuscripts under review and several ongoing projects. Jennifer has had the privilege of teaching a variety of courses, including Children, Adolescents, and the Media and Public Speaking (both at MU and Columbia College). She was also a teaching assistant for Media Communication and Society and has served in various capacities as the Assistant Course Director, lead teaching assistant, and honors instructor throughout her time at MU.  She received the Loren Reid Outstanding Graduate Student Teaching Award in May, 2015.

Jennifer Lewallen
JenniferLewallen@mizzou.edu
Advisor: Dr. Elizabeth Behm-Morawitz
Vita


Ryan M. Maliski is a doctoral candidateRyan in the Department of Communication at the University of Missouri (M.A., Communication, San Diego State University, 2013; B.S., Communication, Arizona State University, 2011). His research is focused on interpersonal communication and health. He is specifically interested in research that uncovers the potential biological underpinnings of interpersonal communication and the role and impact of stress. Ryan’s dissertation is a communicated perspective-taking intervention and explores the stress and recovery for both a teller and a listener during a discussion about a stressful experience. Through a laboratory-based experimental design he is integrating cardiovascular measurements. This research seeks to identify is communicated perspective-taking is a stressful communicative act and if the presence of a high level of communicated perspective-taking leads to positive health outcomes. Ryan’s research contributions can be seen in articles published in Health Communication and Communication Monographs. His passion for research is underscored through his teaching of Communication Research Methods. In addition to teaching Communication Research Methods, he has taught Public Speaking over five years and was invited to lead a research workshop on “Navigating Qualtrics”, hosted by the Institute of Family Diversity and Communication. Ryan plans to defend his dissertation in Spring 2017 and will be seeking a tenure-track position to begin in the Fall of 2017

Ryan M. Maliski
Ryan.Maliski@missou.edu
Advisor: Dr. Haley Kranstuber Horstman
Vita


JessJessica M. Rick is a doctoral candidate in the department of communication at the University of Missouri (M. A., Speech Communication, North Dakota State University, 2013; B.A. Communication Studies, International Studies, & Spanish, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2010). Her research examines the communicative constructions of identity and stigma amidst gender, social class, and family diversity discourses, particularly as experienced within work-life contexts. Jessica’s dissertation project examines how parent and non-parent workers co-construct workplace flexibility stigma amidst micro, meso, and macro-level Discourses. Her work has been published in the Journal of Applied Communication Research and Journal of General Education, as well as in several edited books, including a forthcoming piece on childfree worker identity and stigmaJessica is also a member of and frequent presenter at NCA, CSCA, and OSCLG. She currently serves as a research/editorial assistant to the journal Culture and Organization. Jessica has experience working with large lectures and smaller seminar-style classes, including Public Speaking, Honors Public Speaking, Public Speaking for Business, Survey of Communication Studies, and Organizational Communication. She received the Loren Reid Outstanding Graduate Student Teaching Award in May 2016. Jessica plans to defend her dissertation in Spring 2017 and will be seeking a tenure-track position to begin in the Fall of 2017.

Jessica M. Rick
jessicarick@mizzou.edu
Advisor: Dr. Rebecca Meisenbach
Vita


MaryMary Sorenson is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Communication at the University of Missouri (B.A. Communication Studies, Bethel University, 2009; M.A. Instructional and Political Communication, Illinois State University, 2013). Her research primarily explores strategic communication within two primary contexts: college campus communities and the use of comedy/humor as a persuasive tool. Mary’s dissertation project aims to better understand how colleges and universities can more effectively communicate about crises and emergencies through mediated alert systems. Through two separate experiments, her project first addresses individual message effectiveness and secondly uses the Social Media Crisis Communication (SMCC) Model as a foundation for understanding how social media users influence campus emergency communication. Her goal is to not only advance emergency communication research, but increase safety for campus communities by bettering their communication practices. Mary’s work has been featured in journals such as Journal of American College Health, Current Psychiatry Reports, Computers in Human Behavior, and Communication Teacher. At Illinois State and the University of Missouri, Mary has taught courses in Crisis Communication (classroom and online), Communication Theory, and Public Speaking. She has also been a TA for Small Group Communication and a guest lecturer for both Crisis Communication and Political Communication. Mary is currently a research fellow for the Disaster and Community Crisis Center at the University of Missouri and actively engages with the American Democracy Project through blog-writing and event coordination. She plans to defend her dissertation in April 2017 and is seeking a tenure track position to begin in the fall of 2017.  

Mary Sorenson
marysorenson@mail.missouri.edu
Advisor: Dr. Brian Houston
Vita


Ashton Gerding Speno is a postdoctoral fellow in the Departments of Communication, Health Sciences, and Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Missouri (B.A., Communication, University of Missouri, 2009; M.A., Communication, University of Delaware, 2011; Ph.D., Communication, University of Missouri, 2016). Her research primarily focuses on issues of gender and sexualization in the media, adolescents’ experiences with new media technologies, and media effects on attitudes, behaviors, health outcomes, and self-concept. Her dissertation examined the psychosocial predictors of adolescent sexting, focusing specifically on developmental, gendered, and technological explanations. Ashton has presented several single- and co-authored competitively selected papers at the National Communication Association, International Communication Association, Central States Communication Association, and Eastern States Communication Association conferences, and was also selected to present her research at the 2015 National Communication Association’s Doctoral Honors Seminar. Her work has been has published in journals such as Sex Roles, The Journal of Media Psychology, and Communication Monographs, and she currently has manuscripts under review at Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, Communication Research, and Communication Monographs.  During her time at the University of Missouri, Ashton has had the pleasure of teaching classes such as Perspectives on Mass Media: Gender, Sexuality, Race, and Class, New Technologies and Communication, and Public Speaking, and was the lead teaching assistant for Media Communication and Society.  She served as the Course Redesign Assistant for Media Communication and Society as the course moved from a traditional lecture format to a hybrid face-to-face/online lecture format, and has experience teaching in traditional, hybrid, and online contexts. 

Ashton Gerding Speno
algtf3@mail.missouri.edu
Advisor: Dr. Elizabeth Behm-Morawitz
Vita


philPhilip Tschirhart is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Communication at the University of Missouri (B.A.A. Communication & Political Science, Central Michigan University, 2010; M.A. Communication Studies, Central Michigan University, 2012). His scholarship critically examines global development initiatives and transnational social movements that utilize economic and environmental appeals for solidarity and sustainability.  Philip’s dissertation project analyzes the rhetorical circulation of manifestos that position human-caused climate change as a global rhetorical exigence. The transnational framework consistent throughout Philip’s program of research reorients the critical scope implicit within global development initiatives and social movements. In his dissertation project, he uses transnational theory to problematize and expand relations of identity, subjectivity, and agency associated with environmental visions of the future. He has recently published in the journal of Critical Studies in Media Communication (click for link to article) and has other published work in interdisciplinary journals related to anthropology and philosophy (forthcoming in Badiou Studies). Philip has developed and instructed courses including argumentation and advocacy, introduction to public speaking, and has assisted as a lab leader in the writing intensive undergraduate introduction to communication studies course. In addition, Philip served as a research associate for the Political Communication Institute and has served as a guest reviewer and editor for Feminist Media Studies and regional and national conference organizations. 

Philip Tschirhart
philip.tschirhart@mail.missouri.edu
Advisor: Ben Warner
Vita